Bousquet-Knochen Agreement

Bousquet-Knochen Agreement

But first, at the June 11 meeting, Eichmann decided to withdraw from himmler`s 150,000-strong deportation program decided by Himmler in January, although he allowed the deportation of an additional contingent of victims unfit to work with the workers. In France, Dannecker developed the procedures, since the department to which he belonged had just taken over the management of law enforcement and police cases in the occupied area. Indeed, the issue of hostages had affected many different protagonists, because each decision had given rise to many discussions between the various German repressive organizations and with the French authorities at the highest hierarchical level. Between the military commander for occupied France, Otto von S selvingl, and Berlin, a crisis finally erupted. He was replaced in February 1942 and on 9 March Hitler decided to appoint a HSSPF (Senior SS and Police Officer) to the MBF, Karl Oberg, and to hire him now for repression – and therefore also for the “hostage policy”. Oberg took office at the end of May. Together with his deputy Helmut Knochen, he revived the policy of cooperation with the French police: the “Oberg Bousquet” agreement, adopted at the end of July and presented on 8 August, “formalised the close cooperation of the [German and French] police forces in the field of repression.” (D. Peschanski, 2004: 321-332) Sipo-SD staff were limited in size and faced with increased resistance activity as they tried to achieve relative effectiveness in the area of enforcement, the stakes were high. While Oberg and Os were constantly trying to meet this need for primary security, which also guaranteed the efficient exploitation of French economic resources, they also obtained during the negotiations the cooperation of the Vichy administration in the arrest and deportation of Jews from France; the French authorities have declared themselves ready to hand over foreign and stateless Jews considered undesirable.

“To begin the decisive phase of mass deportation, the German authorities have adapted the anti-Jewish system to the regulations in force in society, from which they have eliminated the Jews.” Maxime Steinberg thus underlined the “xenophobic beginning” of this deportation programme decided in June 1942 (Mr.